Sep 132014
 
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Issue

Today had a customer who was facing warning: RC4005/C4005 after installing VS2013 Update 3. They also had installed the Windows 8.1 SDK. Any new project created in the IDE showed these symptoms so this was not caused by existing code.

Cause

It turned out that his include file settings in project properties was causing this. It was missing a critical include…

$(WindowsSDK_IncludePath)

We added above include as illustrated below and the warnings (RC4005/C4005) went away…

image

Hope this helps save your time. Smile

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Aug 052014
 
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Had a customer who a opened a ticket for help on this error. The project built fine on Windows 8 but after upgrading to Windows 8.1 he started seeing above error on compilation using a 64 bit toolset.

After much troubleshooting we found the issue to be caused by a pre-release version of WDK installed on his machine. RCToolPath pointed to an older version of WDK8.1.

Customer uninstalled pre-release of WDK (to be precise: Windows Driver Kit for Windows 8.1 Preview) and installed WDK RTM. This resolved the tracker error in this case.

Blogging on this just in case you’re pulling your hair out trying to figure.

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Feb 032014
 
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DataRepeater is great control to display data from a table/view, as the name says repeats bunch of fields from a dataset on every row. Follow these simple steps to get started working with this control…

Step 1:

Add a reference to the PowerPack library as shown here: http://ntcoder.com/bab/2013/12/20/visualbasic-powerpack-missing-from-visual-studio-2013/

Step 2:

Make sure you’ve got the datasets in place: Press Shift + Alt + D or View –> Other Windows –> Data Sources. See below screenshots of my Northwind dataset…

image

Step 3:

Drag and drop an instance of data repeater onto your win forms or a container control. Resultant form will look as follows…

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Please note you’ve got to have the right version of DataRepeater in order for it to get displayed on the form designer surface.

Step 4:

Drag and drop fields from your data set onto this data repeater’s surface. Note that every field dropped on to data repeater will be a pair of control (Label followed by text field or any other control if the option is provided, in my case picture control). I’ve got the following fields dropped on to the control…

image

The size of the control at runtime will be the same as the one you’ve given on the designer, unless you’ve docked the control. Scrollbar’s will be provided by the control to scroll through the rows of data.

Step 5:

Now if I run the form this is what I see. You can scroll through as well. Quick way to display data on a form.

image

Step 6:

DataRepeater supports some other features as well, please go through the documentation to know more. Enjoy!

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Jan 222014
 
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Visual Studio 2013 comes with a new feature called “Debug Managed Memory” this feature also allows to compare managed memory usage across two dumps.  Read on…

This is how you would open a .net 4.5 memory dump in Visual Studio…

imageimage

So for the purpose of this blog I’ve created memory dumps of a managed application that consumes high memory: memtest.exe. I’ve collected three memory dumps…

  1. MemTest.dmp
  2. MemTest (2).dmp
  3. MemTest (3).dmp

For demo purpose I’m opening MemTest (3).dmp ‘first’ as shown in the above screenshot. So once you open the dump in Visual studio this is how Visual Studio will look like…

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Check out mouse cursor location in the above screenshot. Click on this option. You’ll following dialog pop up….

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Following which you’ll see the following screen…

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This report will show the most number of objects on heap. If you notice the largest objects in my case are ArrayLists and second one is MemTest.Form1, too many forms. The also shows you the roots to an object.

Further in the above screenshot, I’ve highlighted an item in red. That option allows us to compare multiple dumps. The resultant report will show you the diff view between the two dumps. For demo I’m comparing MemTest (3).dmp with MemTest.dmp. MemTest (3).dmp was collected after  memtest.dmp was collected so you should ideally see a positive diff between the two dumps as the memory is increasing. See screenshot…

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You’ll see that, new columns has been added to this report, for e.g. “Cound Diff.”, ‘Size Diff (Bytes)” etc. The bottom table shows you the “Reference Count Diff.” as well.

Really cool feature! Comparing managed memory has been never easier. Please note this feature is only enabled for.net memory dumps that use .net 4.5.

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Jan 202014
 
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A video presentation on what’s new and cool in Visual Studio 2013 Solution Explorer…

I’ll follow up this presentation with some more presentation on what’s some of the cool things in Visual Studio 2013 just to speed up anyone who’s hopping onto the Visual Studio 2013 wagon.

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Dec 202013
 
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Where’s the Visual Studio 2013 Visual Basic PowerPack?

Note the VisualBasic PowerPack is not part of Visual Studio 2013 install, it comes as separate MSI. The download link for Visual Basic Powerpack for Visual Studio 2013 is hard to find online as well. I found the link from our internal support article.

Download VB Powerpack (direct link to bits): http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=321343

Steps to Install Visual Studio 2013 Visual Basic PowerPack

Installing Visual Basic Powerpacks

Installing Visual Basic Powerpacks

Please close any open instances of Visual Studio 2013. Once the installation completes and if you still don’t see the Powerpack controls in the toolbox. Do the following.

  1. Open Visual Studio 2013
  2. Open the toolbox. Add a new tab, right click on the toolbox, select “Add Tab”. Name the tab to “Visual Basic PowerPack”
  3. Expand the new “Tab”. Right click in the empty space under the new tab and select “Choose Item”. You’ll see the following dialog popup…

    Adding reference to Visual Basic powerpack

    Adding reference to Visual Basic powerpack

  4. Please give it few minutes to load all items. Please select “.Net Framework Components” tab if its not already selected.
  5. In the filter text box control please type in “Power”. You should see something like this in the above dialog…

    Choose toolbox items

    Choose toolbox items

  6. Check the relevant ones and add them to your toolbox as shown below…

    Adding Filter for powerpack in the Choose toolbox items dialog

    Adding filter for powerpack in the Choose toolbox items dialog

  7. Once you click ok, you should see the following controls added to your toolbox…

    PowerPack controls listed in VS toolbox

    PowerPack controls listed in VS toolbox

  8. In my case I’ve added all powerpack controls to my toolbox.
  9. You might also have to add a reference to this new powerpack library if you still see compilation errors. Be aware that the assembly name has changed as well…

    Adding reference to new powerpack library

    Adding reference to new powerpack library

Conclusion

We’ve had couple of customer’s who report that Visual Basic powerpack is missing from Visual Studio 2013.
http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/801421/microsoft-visualbasic-powerpacks-vs-dll

Enjoy the powerpack.

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Oct 172013
 
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Some useful links…

Visual Studio 2013 Available Now!
Visual Studio 2013 Highlights
System Requirements and Platform Compatibility
Known issues for Visual Studio 2013 (Readme)
Known issues for .NET Framework 4.5.1 (Readme)
Known issues for Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2013 (Readme)
Windows Store is now open for submitting apps targeting Windows 8.1

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